click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130106
20130114
STATION
CNNW 9
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 3
LINKTV 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states face
is assad. you thought last year he would have fallen by now. most people did. it looks like a better prediction this year, but it seems as though it's even conceivable that he could wait out 2013 or no? >> no, i don't think so. i would say he hasn't fallen yet, but we're now into the end game where it's clear he's going to fall and just a question of how long, not just we're predicting, we want him out, but he really is on his way out. i don't think there is any way he will survive 2013, but i'm not convinced there will be a government to replace him by the end of 2013. >> why has he stayed there as long? i was more skeptical that he would fall quickly and the reason was simple. a very strong army and they have been incredibly brutal in their willingness to use it against the rebels. >> that's part of it. it's a real state. this is not like -- this is a real state but look what happened to the sunnis in iraq. they took their cue from that. they know it's not going to be pretty aftermath and they had external support. the russians and the chinese diplomatically and the iranians milita
and the religion of syria's president assad. if he is overthrown, will all alawites become targets? >>> and bob faw on what some catholic school systems are doing to try to survive? >> our educational system was imploding. enrollment-wise, finance wise, something radical, radical surgery had to be done. >> announcer: major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is dedicated to i founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual group and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the january henson foundation, and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. arguments continue over the so-called "fiscal cliff" deal approved this week in the fina minutes of the 112th congress. and religious groups are among those weighing in. the family research council criticized the deal for not including spending cuts and entitlement reforms. meanwhile, leaders of the christian group bread for the world said while the measure
making news now. >>> a show of defiance today from syrian president, bashar al assad. in front of his supporters, the syrian leader gave his first public speech since june and effectively thumbed his nose at the international community, insisting his vision of syria's future will lead the country out of crisis. al assad also refused to work with the opposition, calling them "enemies of god who will go to hell." al assad has lost all legitimacy and he has to step down, the state department says. >>> search is on right now for famed fashion director vittorio missoni. he, his wife and four others were on a plane that disappeared off the coast of venezuela this weekend. he helps lead a fashion empire worth millions of dollars. >>> as you drone attack killed 17 suspected militants in pakistan's tribal region today that strike near the afghan border injured three, according to intelligence sources. it follows two similar attacks last week, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 2
there was a surprise nationwide address by the dictator bashar al-assad andddres what he had to say was a cause for worry. it was his first speech in six months and assad said he won't step down and he won't negotiate with the rebels. the civil war there has spilled over syria's borders from time to time so now u.s. soldiers have landed in turkey to man patriot missiles on the border. holly williams is ourrder. correspondent in turkey reporting from istanbul tonight. holly, why do the turks wanty, these patriot missile batteries?es >> reporter: well, scott, turkey asked its nato allies-- including the united states-- toes-- provide patriot missiles because of fears that syria might use chemical weapons.e the turkish are nervous firstly because they have openly backedr the rebels in syria's civil war and secondly because they share a 600 mile long border with syria and we've already seen fighting spilling across that border. these six missile batteries are aimed at detering a much bigger inversion, they're capable of intercepting missiles and aircraft and they would be usedd they to defend turk
to the asad -- assad regime, and trying to insist the planes land for inspection. they have just done two inspections, and one plane was empty from damascus. it's a good question, and i think the answer is a complicated one, but i would say two things, in any country that is a newly emerging country, there is a sense of nationalism that you have to contend with which is legitimate. they have air own government and leaders. you can't dictate to them what to do, and there are a lot of states in the region that have their -- trying to meddle in iraq, the iranians big time, turkey, gulf states, trying to exert influence inside iraq, but, also, a big part of the answer is, really, what's happened to the united states? the american government is conflicted on iraq. the obama administration, itself, was ambivalent about whether to keep forces in iraq beyond 2011 or not, and, in fact, president obama campaigned on the ten in a minute that he had extra kateed forces from iraq completely, planned to, the military hoped to keep 5,000 to 15,000 there, including to fight al-qaeda, so, you know, when t
and describe a national reconciliation conference and a new syrian constitution. guest: president assad has adopted a bellicose reaction to the rebellion. it is not an all-out civil war. throughout this conflict, he has adopted this tone that these people are terrorists and criminals. 60,000 syrians have been killed in the civil war. he is going to come middle ground to the rebels who think they are winning at this point. host: cure associated press is pointing out this is his first speech since last june theory his opponents are -- the associated press is pointing out that this is his first speech since last june. guest: the rebels are winning this conflict. the question is how long will it go on and how many syrians have to die before the assad regime toppled or some deal is reached to send him into exile. there is no deal that leaves him sharing any power. host: if he goes into exile, which country will take him? guest: russia has been his biggest backer. it comes immediately to mind as someone who would want to take someone responsible for the death of 60,000. host: during the conflict,
of damascus where rebels have pushed out troops loyal to president assad. to the north, around 00 men, -- 100 men, women, and children had paid smugglers to take them across be the border to turkey but were deported. this from one of the largest refugee camps. >> this is one of the largest refugee camps in turkey. a container city along the border with syria. the cubicles are equipped with running water, heaters and air conditioning. the 13,000 refugees living here don't have to worry about the cold or floods. but for most, it's still a long way from the comforts of home. >> we can't wait to go back home. but, look, we have been abandoned. we thought it was going to be a matter of three months. the world is against us much the arab world, the west, the arab league, they have all left us on our own. >> this man and his family may be luckier than those trapped inside syria or the thousands of refugees facing tougher conditions in jordan and lebanon, but any time they watch the news, they are distressed. >> the scenes of the refugees facing cold are heartbreaking. these are children. i cannot fi
by the syrian president bashar assad his first since june. yesterday he laid out what he called a peace plan which included new constitution and a, quote: national reconciliation conference. at the same time the syrian president urged his supporters not to give up the fight against the rebel forces whom he called murderous criminals. hello mirror. the secretary general is disappointed bashar assad has no plan at all to i understand the suffering of syria's men women and children. the civil war has killed more than 60,000 people since it broke out nearly two years ago. the chief fox report correspondent jonathan hunt is with us. jonathan, some the rhetoric from assad just astounding and some response from the united states. >> yeah. the same thing we have heard again and again it appears to be groundhog day in both damascus and washington. president assad talking once again about the way he says he is committed to what he calls a national dialogue but at the same time condemning anyone who fights his regime as either a terrorist or a criminal. officials here in the u.s. condemning that kind
, this round of sanctions? we're going to talk about that. >>> syria's president assad proposing a peace deal to end the blood did i civil war. he is out with a new proposal. why it is being rejected next. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. jenna: welcome back. everybody one. we await the president's announcement today for two new nominees for the secretary of defense and the head of cia there are some brand new developments in the iran nuclear showdown we want to talk to you about. the u.s. is again tighting the economic news noose by releasing ne
all assad -- bashar al-assad as part of it. the u.s. defense secretary says the u.s.-led coalition has reached the last chapter in its goal to ensure afghanistan can look after its own security. leon panetta has been meeting the afghan president in washington. karzai also met hillary clinton, and he is due to hold talks with barack obama. we have more from washington. >> u.s. troop levels, u.s. financial aid, and political support for the afghan central government. those are some of the key issues dominating the agenda as hamid karzai continues his visit to washington. he has already met with leon panetta to talk specifically about the u.s. forces that would be necessary after the official end of the war of the end of 2014. the question will be what kind of responsibility will the troops have and what kind of legal protection will they have to carry out their mission. one thing the u.s. is keen to improve as the afghan security forces are capable of providing for national security across the country, but there are some critics who suggest this may be optimistic talk, given one out of t
assad, and then a discussion on the future of u.s. energy policy. at 11:00 p.m., "q&a" with timothy naftali, former director of the nixon presidential library. >> studentcam video and trees are now do, friday, january 18, for your chance at the ground prize -- the grand prize. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> in a rare address to the nation, syrian president bashar al assad talked about moving forward but made no mention of stepping down. he proposed a new constitution, which he said would have new laws. he thanked russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend itself against outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed was in 2012. this comes to was courtesy of aljazeera english. -- comes to us. >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [crowd chanting] not so long after, it was said that maybe as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives in during the course of the 21- month conflict. while our translators are standing by to bring you -- pres
today from bashar al assad, and more bloodshed throughout the country. >>> a syrian opposition group says at least 101 people were killed today nationwide. 28 died in de mass cass and the suburbs, 22 in aleppo. as the bombs were falling and the bullets flying, the syrian president lashed out at rebels during his first public speech in seven months. assad was affectionately mobbed by a crowd of adorning supporters in the capital. he told his people and the world that syria is not undergoing the revolution and as long as terrorists are in the country they will not stand down. >> translator: this is a conflict between authority at power or between the enemies of the homeland. this is a conflict those who wanted to take revenge against the people to fragment syria. those are the enemies of the people. and the enemies of god. and the enemies of god will go to hell. >> assad also laid out a plan to end the war starting with foreign can'ts ending their support for what he calls terrorists. his speech drew immediate condemnation from leaders notice u.s. and britain. >>> the dangers in syria
's embattled president al assad made it clear that he has no plans to step down as the country's leader. he offered a peace plan but rolled out any talks with the armed opposition and said they will not negotiate until regional countries stop fighting. assad must step down. the state department called assad's initiative "detached" from reality in an attempt to cling to power. >>> venezuela's leader hugo chavez is still in cuba following a cancer operation last month. chavez is set to be inaugurated for a fourth presidential term on thursday. it may be postponed if not returned in time. his absense would create a constitutional crisis, possibly leading to an interim government and another election. >>> coming up next, why the bill to avert the first round of the fiscal cliff was stuck with billions, that's right, billions with a "b" of corporate tax gives aways from wall street to hollywood and nascar and you're watching "daily rundown" only on msnbc. first 20 came off, well it wasn't too hard at all." i love breads. you can still eat bread. i love my sweets. i can still have a cookie on wei
is very concerned about what would happen to syria's chemical weapons if the dictator bashar al-assad is overthrown. panetta said there are no plans to send u.s. troops into the civil war there that has killed 60,000 so far. he said the u.s. has been talking to syria's neighbors including israel, about how to keep those weapons out of the hands of terrorists. syria's civil war began as avi popular uprising. the u.n. says more than 600,000 refugees have fled. many have gone to turkey, andne clarissa ward is there. >> reporter: this may look like a basement storefront, but hidden inside is a school for 500 children, all of them refugees from syria's civil war. we visited an english class... hello. >> hello! >> reporter: ...where we met 13- year-old omar. where are you from, omar? >> i'm from aleppo. >> reporter: from aleppo. >> yes. >> reporter: aleppo, syria's largest city, has been pounded for months by the syrian air force. whole neighborhoods have been reduced to rubble. when the fighting got too close, omar and his family fled across the border to turkey. why did you come here? >>
economic turmoil. this is the first time president assad has offered a comprehensive plan to end the conflict in syria. the crowds chanted "we will defend you" as he entered. adjusted a conference of reconciliation -- he suggested a conference of reconciliation and a new constitution. >> this is what is going to preserve syria in the future and its politics and economics. in order to agree on new laws to protect and run the parties. we will have a referendum. thirdly, we have an expanded government which carries out the national charter. fourthly, we will put it to the people in the conference of dialogue to agree to the laws, including a loss for election. anything to do with the constitution and law, people can say in the conference of dialogue if the government can carry out whatever is agreed on. a new government to be set up in accordance with the constitution. also, we have a general congress to have reconciliation and give amnesty to everyone in prison and preserve the civil rights. thirdly, to work to reestablish the infrastructure and compensate people who have suffered
and missiles. and defiant new remarks by al assad are dashing hopes the fighting will end anytime soon. cnn's nick payton walsh is in beirut. >> reporter: france today echoed western condemnation of assad's speech on sunday. saying he was in denial of reality and, quote, not fooling anyone. i think what we can really take away from his very defiant tone in front of loyal crowds in a theater in damascus is really the end of all efforts for a peaceful settlement by u.n. and even by moscow's diplomats. there had been such high hopes that it would result in some sort of nudge towards assad giving a political concession or finding some kind of settlement. the way ahead, many fear, is the escalation of violence as we go into the military end game here. assad clear he's simply not going to give up power. as that violence escalates, of course the concern is for the humanitarian situation. half a million refugees registered in syria's neighbors. fears that will mount by hundreds of thousands if the violence escalates. the larger fear now in the months ahead. bitter chill of winter hitting these peop
nations. our translator is standing by to bring you president bashar al- assad, live. >> members of the government, ladies and gentlemen, today i would look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria and do not see an innocent smile on their faces. i look at the hands of the elderly and i see them praying for their children, daughters, and grandchildren. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans. siblings have been divided. this pain is spread over the country. from the pain, hope is born. from difficulty, solutions come. a dark cloud would hide the sun, but it would provide rain and cleanliness that would provide goodness for the country. syria will not come out of its impulse unless it changes this into a solution that will bring the country out of its impulse but it has never witnessed in the history of this region. this is the only way we can remedy all the injuries and deep wounds that we have in syria and the only way to keep syria
is the situation right now in regards to syria's nuclear weapons? does assad have the intention to use those weapons? do you think the visit to the pentagon is to discuss the this topic, this issue? >> the secretary panetta and him have met on a number of occasions. i'm sure the talk of syria will come up. to your question on chemical weapons, without get together deep in intelligence i'm unaware of any information that the syrians are planning to use the chemical weapons. let me be very clear, this government would view that kind of actions a a red line. officials have been clear about that. we will continue to do so. the assad regime and it continues to perpetrate violence against its own people, it is unacceptable and it is time for the assad regime to go. but in the meantime, they have a serious responsibility to maintain security over their chemical weapons and not to use them. >> so you believe that the syrian chemical weapons are in good hands, are safe so far? >> the syrian regime has an obligation to maintain security over the syrian chemical weapons stockpiles. i have not heard of
, gave a rare public speech there. bashar al assad blamed, quote, enemies of the people for syria's problems. >> translator: this is a government who wanted to take revenge against the people, and to fragment syria. those are the enemies of the people. and the enemies of god, and the enemies of god will go to hell. >> but the president of egypt says al assad is the one responsible for the bloodshed that killed a reported 60,000 syrians in the last two years here. mohamed morsi spoke yesterday with wolf blitzer. >> translator: it is not i who wants this but the syrian people who want this. this phase is the phase of the people, similar to what the egyptian people wanted, the seer syrian people want it and we support the syrian people and they are going to win and they have the will to win. >> you say the syrian people want bashar al assad to be tried for war crimes. >> translator: the syrian people drew their revolution and through the movement will, when the bloodshed stops, move to a new stage where they will have an independent parliament and the government of their choosing. an
reports the chemical weapons of the bashar al-assad regime are ready and could be launched within hours if the order is given. live details on that when we continue. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. times reporting that syria's stock of chemical weapons is loaded and ready for use if president bashar al-assad gives the order to use them on his own people as that war rages. leland vittert watches it live from our middle east bureau. what is the latest now? >> reporter: though the intelligence came out a couple of weeks ago that the syrians had begun mixing the chemical weapons, that was based on satellite intelligence and signals intelligence, meaning communications intercept. that's when the u.s. went into high gear diplomatically and made it clear to the syrians and the r*ugtss that the use of chemical weapons would be crossing a r
bashar al assad outlined new ways for the country to move forward, but he made no mention of stepping down as leader. he thanked russia and china for their support and stressed his country would do whatever it needed to defend itself against, quote, outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed the nation was in june of 2012. this 55-minute event is courtesy of al-jazeera english. [cheers and applause] >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [inaudible] officials from the united nations said there may be as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21-month conflict. [inaudible conversations] our translator's standing by to bring you -- [applause] the words of bashar bashar al assad live from the syrian capital. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: members of the government, heads and members of people's organizations, ladies and gentlemen, today i would look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children
assad had an army of robotic weapon that fall any order because unlike human beings, robots always follow orders. should we go there or think today about drawing a line, of fully autonimous weapons. >> in a way, it's technofedism. they are possible because of the way of the infrastructure that's behind them. that are the pointy edge of the speer, but the decision, the ability to go from a hyper deductive form of gathering to an inductive form of analytics, using patterns, i worry about
, the syrian president bashar al-assad. he proposed a new constitution that he said would include new laws for the parties and local administration. he think russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend themselves from outside forces. the last time he addressed the nation was in june 2012. coverage comes to us courtesy of al-jazeera english. >> this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. official figures in united nations said as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21 month conflict. [chanting] our translator is standing by. [applause] [applause] president bashar al-assad, live from the syrian capital. >> ladies and gentlemen, today i look at your faces and the faces of the people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria. i'd look at the hands of the elderly today, pain and suffering is spread all over syria. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans.
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)